Labour Law Review Publications

Labour Law Review 2007

by Jennifer Eady QC, Betsan Criddle and Rebecca Tuck

Published in September 2007

As the authors of this year’s Labour Law Review note - the labour law year 2006-07 saw a number of notable case, particularly in the field of equal pay, guidance on the burden of proof in discrimination claims and the first trickle of cases from new heads of discrimination including age and religion and belief.

Labour Law Review 2006

By Jenny Eady QC and Betsan Criddle

Published in September 2006

This year’s edition of Labour Law Review is a timely reminder of how far our framework of law has developed in recent years and how far we still need to go before fairness at work can be achieved. As usual, the authors concentrate on those cases which they believe have made a significant difference or which provide useful guidance for workers and their representatives.

Labour Law Review 2005

By Jenny Eady QC and Rebecca Tuck

Published in September 2005

Following the election of an historic third term Labour government, this year’s edition of Labour Law Review is a timely reminder of how far our framework of law has developed in recent years and how far we still need to go before fairness at work can be envisaged.

Labour Law Review 2004

by Jennifer Eady and Rebecca Tuck

Published in September 2004

As we head towards the possibility of an historic third term Labour Government, this year’s Labour Law Review provides a timely reminder of the strengths and weaknesses of the UK’s framework of employment law.

Labour Law Review 2003

By Jennifer Eady and Rebecca Tuck

Published in September 2003

As the Government undertakes its review of the Employment Relations Act, this year’s edition of Labour Law Review provides its usual authoritative insight into the main statutory and legislative developments in labour law.

Labour Law Review 2002

By Jennifer Eady and Rebecca Tuck

Published in September 2002

The extended length of this year’s Labour Law Review reflects the increasing significance of the law at work. New statutory developments and continuing judicial interpretations may offer new opportunities but they also add to the complexity facing trade unionists at work. The aim of this Review is to clarify these developments and highlight the main implications of the leading cases.

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