Dave Lewis

Dave Lewis

Dave Lewis, Professor of Employment Law, Middlesex University

Professor of Employment Law David Law gained an LLB (Hons) from the London School of Economics and an MA in Industrial Relations from the University of Warwick. He also holds a Diploma in Personnel Management.

He is a member of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, the Industrial Law Society and the Association of Law Teachers, and is a Member of the Institute of Employment Rights and the Society of Legal Scholars.

After starting out as a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Law at Middlesex Polytechnic, before becoming a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Law at Middlesex University, he then moved to Australia and taught at the University of Wollongong.

He then rejoined Middlesex as a Reader in Employment Law in 1993 and has also since worked as a Visiting Researcher at the Fafo Institute for Labour and Social Research in Oslo, Norway.

David also makes regular media appearances to discuss his specialist subjects of unfair dismissal and whistleblowing. In this field, he is the Convener of the International Whistleblowing Research Network, runs the annual Middlesex University Whistleblowing Award and is the head of the Whistleblowing Research Unit at Middlesex.

Trade unions have the power to make a difference for whistleblowers

Dave Lewis:  Professor of Employment Law, Middlesex University
Dave Lewis: Professor of Employment Law, Middlesex University

14 January 2016

Dave Lewis, Professor of Employment Law, Middlesex University

If you became aware of wrongdoing within your workplace, who would you go to? Most would go to their line managers, and normally this is the best thing to do; but what if your line manager does nothing? And what if you don't trust them, or you believe they may even be complicit in the issue you wish to report? At this stage, many people's intuition would be to disclose the matter to their trade union rep, but if doing so is not part of the workplace's whistleblowing procedure, then they are not protected by the Employment Rights Act 1996 and could be dismissed.

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