Keith Ewing

Keith Ewing

Keith Ewing
Keith Ewing

Keith Ewing

Professor Keith Ewing is Professor of Public Law at King's College London. He has written extensively on labour law including recognition procedures and international standards. He is also the President of the Institute of Employment Rights

Select Committee's recommendations on Trade Union Bill don't go far enough

04 March 2016

By Keith Ewing, President of the IER

Clause 10 of the Trade Union Bill contains a pernicious and vindictive attack on trade union political freedom.

TUC 2015 IER report

25 September 2015

The Institute attended this year’s Trade Union Congress on the 13th-16th of September. This is a short report of our highlights of the conference, which we believe will have a significant bearing on the tact of the movement in the year ahead.

Human Rights at Work: possibilities and problems for Labour Law

Wednesday 1 July 2015

A one-day conference

GMB, 22 Stephenson Way,
Euston, London

The Institute of Employment Rights in association with Morrish Solicitors LLP

Write up:

1 July 2015

By Roger Jeary, IER Blogger

On the hottest day in London this year, the Institute welcomed delegates to the GMB London Office to hear from leading legal and academic experts on the impact of government promises to repeal the Human Rights Act and replace it with a British Bill of Rights. The conference programme also looked at the wider impact of human rights on the world of work and what it might mean for labour law in the UK.

TTIP, ISDS and INTA; the elephant in the room

5 June 2015

By Professor Keith Ewing and John Hendy QC

1

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is the secret trade deal currently being negotiated between the EU and the USA. Its text is a closely guarded secret shared only by the negotiators (including representatives of multinational corporations). Drafts are withheld from both MEPs and members of all the European national Parliaments (as well as US congress and senate members).

Trade Unions and the General Election 2015

13 May 2015

By Professor Keith Ewing

Shortly after the general election in 2010, I wrote in these columns that Cameron would win the 2015 general election (Morning Star, 18 June 2010). The reason for this was largely historical. In this country Tory governments typically get at least two terms. Indeed since the end of the Second World War only one Tory government – that elected on 1970 – has failed to do so.

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