Sarah Glenister

Sarah Glenister, IER staff

Sarah Glenister
Sarah Glenister

Sarah Glenister

Sarah Glenister is the Institute of Employment Rights' IT Development and Communications Assistant.

Tories scrap pay cap for all the wrong reasons

10 October 2017

By Sarah Glenister, National Development Officer, Institute of Employment Rights

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt has confirmed that the NHS pay cap is to be scrapped, but asked whether the NHS would receive more funding to cover higher pay, he said: "That is something I can't answer right now."

Corporate Governance reforms offer greater transparency, but no real change

29 August 2017

By Sarah Glenister, National Development Officer, IER

Launching a consultation into Corporate Governance at the end of 2016, the government announced that workers needed a stronger voice to ensure businesses operated with regard to the interests of their workforce, and to tackle excessive corporate pay. But in her foreword, Theresa May reassured employers that her party remains "unequivocally and unashamedly pro-business" and that the motivation for reform was to protect the reputation of the free market at a time of surging wage inequality. It should not surprise us, then, that proposals published today in response to that consultation offer little more than superficial changes that give the appearance of reform without actually affecting it.

Workers need a voice but Taylor can’t provide it

21 March 2017

By Sarah Glenister, National Development Officer, Institute of Employment Rights

Matthew Taylor has made preliminary proposals as to how employment law could change to prevent exploitation, but in an article originally published by the Scottish Left Review, Sarah Glenister explains how without stronger trade union rights, it will not be possible for workers to stand up to unscrupulous employers.

The so-called “party of workers” shows its true colours today

01 March 2017

By Sarah Glenister, National Development Officer, Institute of Employment Rights

On taking the mantle of Prime Minister last year, Theresa May attempted to rebrand the Tories the “party of workers”. The outcome of the referendum had been widely interpreted as a battlecry from a much maligned working class. Meanwhile, a rising tide of exposes in the national press had horrified a nation by revealing Dickensian conditions at major employers like Sports Direct and Amazon.

BREXIT: How do we stand in solidarity with both migrant and UK workers at a time of great division?

16 February 2017

By Sarah Glenister, National Development Officer, Institute of Employment Rights

The future is uncertain for migrant workers in the UK as the government prepares to trigger Article 50 next month. Thus far, Theresa May has neglected to provide any assurances to the three million EU workers living in the UK that they will be able to remain in the country and in their jobs. As Jeremy Corbyn told the Guardian this week, the Tories have taken on a "hunger games approach to Brexit". "Families, jobs and homes are all in the balance," he said, accusing the Tories of "playing political games with people's lives".

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