Resources

Union support for Manifesto for Labour Law

Frances O'Grady, General Secretary, TUC

"Since the results of the referendum, the TUC has been campaigning to ensure the vote to leave the EU does not become an excuse to slash workers' rights. It is critical for post-EU Britain to not only maintain the level of protection afforded to Britain's workers by EU law, but also to build on this foundation to create a stronger, fairer and more secure economy for all.

A Manifesto for Labour Law: towards a comprehensive revision of workers’ rights

On 28 June 2016, the Institute of Employment Rights launched its Manifesto for Labour Law at Westminster with Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell and Shadow Minister for Trade Unions Ian Lavery alongside leaders from several major trade unions. The 25 policy recommendations were warmly welcomed by John and Ian, who stated that they would form the blueprint for Labour's official position on workers' rights in post-EU Britain.

Purchase your copy from just £10

On 26 September 2016, John McDonnell announced that the next Labour government would look to implement the IER's policies - see the video below.

A Manifesto for Labour Law: towards a comprehensive revision of workers’ rights

On 28 June, the Institute of Employment Rights launched A Manifesto of Labour Law: towards a comprehensive revision of workers' rights: 25 policy proposals for the next Labour government.

The publication was launched at Westminster with Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell and Shadow Minister for Trade Unions Ian Lavery as part of Labour's Workplace 2020 consultation on reviewing trade union and workers' rights, launched by Jeremy Corbyn in May.

Workers' rights in the UK: Quiz

Take our quiz below to test your knowledge of the current workers' rights and economic situation in the UK and then find out more about how we can change the law to turn the tide on inequality and our unproductive economy by reading about our Manifesto for Labour Law.

Picketing and the Trade Union Bill: Written Evidence

02 February 2016

Professor Keith Ewing and John Hendy QC submitted supplementary written evidence to the Joint Committee on Human Rights, following their initial submission on the Bill in November 2015.

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