Trade Union Rights' Publications

The Future of Company Law: Fat Cats, Corporate Governance and Workers

By Bill Wedderburn

Published in October 2004

All too often we hear news stories about “fat cat” employers paying themselves huge pay increases along with massive bonus packages. The CBI claim that the problem is “confined to a few instances”. The TUC on the other hand call this a “crisis in the legitimacy of capitalism”. However described, what is certain is the discrepancy in pay is fuelling the general inequality apparent in our society.

Unfair Labour Practices: Trade Union Recognition and Employer Resistance

By Keith Ewing, Sian Moore and Stephen Wood

Published in October 2003

On 6th June 2000 a new statutory recognition procedure came into force. The stated aim of the legislation was to ensure that where a trade union has the support of more than 50 per cent of the workforce, it should be recognised by the employer. Three years on, the Institute of Employment Rights has analysed the case-work of the Central Arbitration Committee – the body overseeing the procedure – and examined the extent to which the procedure has delivered on the recognition promise.

Moving Forward on the Railways

By Professor Keith Ewing

Published in July 2003

This publication was commissioned from the Institute of Employment Rights by the Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen (ASLEF).

Federation News - Protecting and Promoting International Labour Standards

Edited by John Hendy and Carolyn Jones

Published in May 2003

There could surely not be a more appropriate time to consider how best to promote, protect and extend international law than now amidst the anguish of war. This edition of Federation News focuses specifically on standards relating to the rights of trade unions and their members.

John Hendy, QC begins by highlighting the UK’s shameful defiance of international standards. He argues that such behaviour should not simply be seen as an item for discussion at trade union education courses. Rather recognising and upholding international standards should form the central argument for repealing and replacing the worst aspects of UK laws. He puts forward a number of strategies for improving the situation, both at national and international level and urges trade unions to pursue them all.

Union Rights… and Wrongs: The Reform of Britain’s Anti-Union Laws

By John Hendy QC

Published in March 2001

Legislation introduced in the UK since 1997 has undoubtedly put in place a more positive and worker-friendly framework of individual employment rights than existed in the deregulated days of the 1980s and ’90s. Nevertheless, research reports show that many workers still fail to enjoy the benefit of these rights at work, contributing to a substantial increase in Tribunal claims.

International Trade Union Rights for the New Millennium

By Keith Ewing and Tom Sibley

Published in December 2000

International Trade Union Rights for the New MilleniumFollowing four years of research and consultation, this report highlights the need for those international labour standards concerning freedom of association to be consolidated, simplified and strengthened.

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