International Comparative Publications

Publications on International Employment Rights and Trade Union Rights

All Institute publications giving an international background to employment rights and trade union rights are listed below. You can read more information on each issue by clicking on the titles.

The Legacy of Thatcherism in European Labour Relations: The Impact of the Politics of Neo-Liberalism and Austerity on Collective Bargaining in a Fragmenting Europe

By Miguel Martinez Lucio, Aristea Koukiadaki and Isabel Tavora

The Legacy of Thatcherism in European Labour Relations: The Impact of the Politics of Neo-Liberalism and Austerity on Collective Bargaining in a Fragmenting Europe

As the UK prepares to leave the European Union, this analysis – the 11th in our Comparative Notes series – shines a light on the deleterious effect of the nation's deregulatory influence on the bloc.

 

 

 

Bolivarian Venezuela: sustained progress for workers' rights

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Bolivarian Venezuela: sustained progress for workers' rights

By Francisco Dominguez and Sian Errington

Published in February 2014

This 10th in the series of Comparative Notes publications, explores the Venezuelan labour law introduced by Hugo Chavez on 1 May 2012.

Workers in Cuba: Unions and Labour Relations - A 2011 Update

By Debra Evenson and Steve Ludlam

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Published in February 2011

This is the ninth in a series of Comparative Notes published by the Institute.

This edition updates the 2003 Comparative Notes 7 by adding an introduction and annex by Steve Ludlam to the original text by Debra Evenson. We have also added a forward from Unite General Secretary, Len McCluskey.

The New Spectre Haunting Europe – The ECJ, Trade Union Rights and the British Government

Edited by Prof Keith Ewing and John Hendy QC

Published in April 2009

In December 2007 the European Court of Justice – the “Supreme Court” of the European Union -delivered a crushing blow to trade unions when in the Viking and Laval decisions it decided that the right of businesses to freedom of establishment must take priority over the right of trade unions to take industrial action to safeguard the interests of their members.

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