Health and Safety Publications

Publications on Health and Safety

All Institute publications focusing on health and safety are listed below. You can read more information on each issue by clicking on the titles.

Health & Safety at Work: Time for Change

By Phil James and David Walters

Health & Safety at Work: Time for Change

The world of work is changing. Fast. But the framework of law tasked with protecting the health, safety and well being of workers is now 50 years old and – according to the authors of this report – no longer fit for purpose. As a result, work continues to generate large and unacceptable levels of harm, despite the massive reductions of employment in high-risk areas of work like manufacturing, docks, steel and mining.

Federation News Spring 2011: Private Enterprise in Public Services

May 2011

The language of "enterprise" has once again come to dominate British society. This enterprise crusade - a throwback to the Thatcherite political ideology of the 1980's - has been launched in the hope of providing moral and economic justification for unprecedented cuts in the public sector.

Regulatory Surrender: Death, Injury and the Non-Enforcement of Law

By Prof Steve Tombs and Dr David Whyte

Published in July 2010

This exciting new publication from Prof Steve Tombs of Liverpool University and Dr David Whyte at Liverpool John Moores University focusses on the issues of enforcement.

 

 

Federation News: Enforcement Issues

Edited by Steve Gibbons

Published in August 2009

This edition brings together an excellent range of issues highlighting the problems associated with the enforcement of rights at work.

Regulating Health and Safety at Work: An Agenda for Change?

By Phil James and David Walters

Published in December 2005

Over a million workers each year suffer an accident at work, more than two million people suffer an illness which they believe to have been caused by their work and more than 25,000 people leave the labour force each year as a result of work-related injury and illness. Such injury and ill health results in the annual loss of over 25 million working days. The estimated cost to the tax payer is over £58 billion in medical and social security costs. The cost to workers and their families is clearly socially and morally unacceptable.

 

 

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