Employment Rights Publications

A Charter of Workers’ Rights

Edited by Professor Keith Ewing and John Hendy QC

Published in September 2002

The Charter of Workers’ Rights was launched at a fringe meeting at TUC Congress on Monday 9th September 2002.

In 2001 the TUC Congress called for the development of a Workers’ Charter. Since then, the Institute has been working with unions, academics and lawyers to develop ideas for such a Charter.

The end result is an impressive report outlining the economic, social and international reasons why a Charter is required. The report has been sponsored by unions large and small with 28 logos included on the cover. It also includes a Foreword from John Monks, General Secretary of the TUC.

The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights: Waste of Time or Wasted Opportunity?

By Keith Ewing

Published in May 2002

The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights was solemnly proclaimed by the heads of government at Nice in December 2000. Although the new Charter includes workers’ rights and trade union rights, it has failed to meet the expectations of the people of Europe. Why?

Between a Rock and a Hard Place: The Problems Facing Freelance Creators in the UK Media Market-Place

By Lionel Bently

Published in March 2002

This report, commissioned by the Creators’ Rights Alliance, documents serious concerns regarding the interests of creative workers (including authors, playwrights, journalists, directors, photographers, composers and musicians) whose rights are being abused on a massive scale.

Whistleblowing and the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998

By Catherine Hobby

Published in December 2001

Inquiries into disasters and scandals have shown that employees will often be the first to be aware of malpractice and corruption in the workplace. Yet prior to the introduction of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 workers who blew the whistle found they had little if any protection against unfair dismissal or victimisation.

Undermining Construction: The Corrosive Effects of False Self-Employment

by Dr Mark Harvey

Published in November 2001

According to the evidence in this report, between 300,000 and 400,000 building workers are falsely registered as self-employed due to the complicated and inadequate system of tax and employment regulation currently operating in the industry.

Building on the National Minimum Wage by Bob Simpson

By Bob Simpson

Published in April 2001

This publication offers a timely review of the impact of the National Minimum Wage on individuals, businesses and the wider economy following the second anniversary of its implementation.

Bob Simpson considers the strengths and weaknesses of the legislation. He looks specifically at the exclusion of those under 18, the lower rate for those under 22 or undertaking training and the lack of adequate enforcement mechanisms.

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