Blog

This is how we can properly protect the health and safety of workers

26 May 2017

By Phil James, Professor of Employment Relations at Middlesex University; David Walters, Professor of Work Environment at Cardiff University; Steve Tombs, Professor of Criminology at the Open University; and David Whyte, Professor of Socio-legal Studies at the University of Liverpool

Too many workers and their families suffer from the failure of their employing organisations to provide safe and healthy working conditions. Injuries, acute and chronic ill-health and death occur all too frequently, also generating emotional and financial costs. Yet employing organisations are rarely held accountable for these outcomes. In fact, most of the associated costs are borne by those harmed and their families, and the taxpayer through the costs of paying benefits and providing health care.

Strong and stable economy? Forgotten macroeconomics in the manifesto debate

25 May 2017

By Özlem Onaran, Professor of Economics, Director of Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre, University of Greenwich

Economist Özlem Onaran analyses the expected impact of both Conservative and Labour Party manifesto pledges on the UK’s economic productivity – a key issue this election, as the nation’s productivity gap with its major G7 competitors is now at its widest point on record.

Can Theresa May Be Taken At Her Word? The Case Of Worker Directors

25 May 2017

By Gregor Gall, Professor of Industrial Relations, the University of Bradford

The Conservative Party manifesto was launched last Thursday, 18 May. In the first section, entitled ‘A strong economy that works for everyone’, one of the highlighted pledges on page 11 is that ‘Theresa May’s Conservatives will deliver ... Fairer corporate governance, built on new rules for takeovers, executive pay and worker representation on company boards’.

What should the political parties be offering whistleblowers at work?

24 May 2017

Dave Lewis, Professor of Employment Law, Middlesex University

Dave Lewis, Professor Employment Law at Middlesex University and a whistleblowing expert looks at what is needed to strengthen the rights of whistleblowers and therefore the safety of workers and public alike. In our Manifesto for Labour Law - the Institute of Employment Rights' recommendations for reform - we argue that individual rights and protections like those covering whistleblowers are best strengthened through sectoral collective agreements, as well as at a statutory level. Our proposal that sectoral collective bargaining should be restored across the UK has been taken up by the Labour Party in their 2017 Manifesto.

Improving Enforcement of Workers’ Rights

23 May 2017

By Michael Ford, Professor Law at University of Bristol and QC at Old Square Chambers

Both the Labour Party and Liberal Democrats have included in their Manifestos a promise to scrap Employment Tribunal (ET) fees. But what has been the impact of the fees and how can the enforcement of workers' rights be improved?

The Tory manifesto and the absence of voice

23 May 2017

Miguel Martinez Lucio, Professor of International HRM & Comparative Industrial Relations, University of Manchester

The engagement of the current government with workers' rights has drawn the attention of the media. Much has been said about how the Conservatives are attempting to encroach on the heartlands of the Labour Party and this current push on workers' rights is seen as an important part of this strategy. Some are even saying the current Conservative Government is taking a post-Thatcherist direction – leaving behind the neoliberal and market-venerating approaches of the 1980s and 1990s Conservative governments – but beyond spin, there is scant evidence for any serious attempt to rebalance the power between employers and the workforce.

This website relies on the use of cookies to function correctly. We understand your continued use of the site as agreement to this.